All Saints’ Day / Halloween

 

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

All Saints’ Day

All-Saints.jpg

Painting by Fra Angelico

Also called
All Hallows

Observed by
Catholic Church,
Eastern Orthodoxy,
Anglican Communion,
Lutheranism[1]
and Methodism,[2]
among other Christian denominations

Liturgical Color
White

Type
Christian

Observances
Church services

Date
1 November (Western Christianity)
Sunday after Pentecost (Eastern Christianity)

Frequency
annual

Related to
Hallowe’en
All Souls’ Day
Day of the Dead
Samhain

All Saints’ Day, also known as All Hallows, Solemnity of All Saints,[3] or Feast of All Saints[4] is a solemnity celebrated on 1 November by the Catholic Church and several Protestant denominations, and on the first Sunday after Pentecost in Eastern Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, in honour of all the saints, known and unknown. The liturgical celebration begins at Vespers on the evening of 31 October and ends at the close of 1 November. It is thus the day before All Souls’ Day.

Hallowmas is another term for the feast, and was used by Shakespeare in this sense.[5][6] However, a few recent writers have applied this term to the three days from 31 October to 2 November inclusive,[7] as a synonym for the triduum of Hallowtide.[8]

In Catholic theology, the day commemorates all those who have attained the beatific vision in Heaven. It is a national holiday in many historically Catholic countries. In the Catholic Church and many Anglican churches, the next day specifically commemorates the departed faithful who have not yet been purified and reached Heaven. Christians who celebrate All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day do so in the fundamental belief that there is a prayerful spiritual bond between those in heaven (the “Church triumphant“), and the living (the “Church militant“). Other Christian traditions define, remember and respond to the saints in different ways; for example, in the Methodist Church, the word “saints” refers to all Christians and therefore, on All Saints’ Day, the Church Universal, as well as the deceased members of a local congregation, are honored and remembered.[9]

All Saints’ Day may originate in the ancient Roman observation of 13 May, the Feast of the Lemures, in which malevolent and restless spirits of the dead were propitiated. Liturgiologists base the idea that this Lemuria festival was the origin of that of All Saints on their identical dates and on the similar theme of “all the dead”.[10]

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the observance. For other uses, see Halloween (disambiguation).

“All Hallows’ Eve” redirects here. For other uses, see All Hallows’ Eve (disambiguation).

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Halloween

Jack-o'-Lantern 2003-10-31.jpg

A jack-o’-lantern, one of the symbols of Halloween representing the souls of the dead[1]

Also called
Hallowe’en
Allhallowe’en
All Hallows’ Eve
All Saints’ Eve

Observed by
Western Christians and many non-Christians around the world[2]

Significance
First day of Allhallowtide

Celebrations
Trick-or-treating, costume parties, making jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, divination, apple bobbing, visiting haunted house attractions

Observances
Church services,[3] prayer,[4] fasting,[2] and vigils[5]

Date
31 October

Next time
31 October 2015

Frequency
annual

Related to
Totensonntag, Blue Christmas, Thursday of the Dead, Samhain, Hop-tu-Naa, Calan Gaeaf, Allantide, Day of the Dead, Reformation Day, All Saints’ Day, Mischief Night (cf. vigils)

Halloween or Hallowe’en (/ˌhæləˈwn, ˈn, ˌhɑːl/) is a yearly celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day. It initiates the triduum of Allhallowtide,[6] the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed believers.[7] Within Allhallowtide, the traditional focus of All Hallows’ Eve revolves around the theme of using “humor and ridicule to confront the power of death.”[8]

According to many scholars, All Hallows’ Eve is a Christianized feast initially influenced by Celtic harvest festivals,[9][10] with possible pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic Samhain.[11][12][13] Other scholars maintain that it originated independently of Samhain and has solely Christian roots.[14][15]

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