Category Archives: Kentucky

Kentucky drug overdose deaths jump 11.5 percent in 2017

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – Drug overdose deaths in Kentucky are increasing despite a drop in opioid prescriptions and heroin use.

A new report from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy says 1,565 people died from drug overdoses in 2017. That’s an 11.5 percent increase from 2016. Kentucky overdose deaths have increased by more than 40 percent since 2013.

Opioids are the main culprit in most deaths. Deaths attributed to heroin have declined. But more than half of the overdose deaths in 2017 were caused by fentanyl, a synthetic opioid.

Every year, Kentucky lawmakers have been passing more laws designed to address the epidemic. Anti-drug advocates celebrate those changes, but their celebration is tempered once a year when the new numbers come out detailing how many more have died.

Nationally, opioids accounted for more than 42,000 deaths in 2016.

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RELATED:

One could theorize that the passage of HB50 which included a provision to “provide funding for the purchase and administration of naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension”,   for Heroin overdoses was a calculated response to what they knew was going to happen when they discontinued “narcotics” at the Doctor’s office…more Heroin deaths.   Per the Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary on July 27, 2015…  LINK

All roads in Kentucky lead you through Hell

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A man in Kentucky is suing the commonwealth to be able to use “IM GOD” on his license plate.

Man sues Kentucky for right to “IM GOD’ license plate

By: NBC4 Staff

FRANKFORT, KY (WCMH) — A man in Kentucky is suing the commonwealth to be able to use “IM GOD” on his license plate.

For more than a decade Ben “Bennie” Hart used the license plate “IM GOD” in Ohio.

Hart, who is an atheist, told WXIX that the personalized license plate helps to spread the message that faith is an individual’s interpretation.

“I can prove I’m God. You can’t prove I’m not. Now, how can I prove I’m God? Well, there are six definitions for God in the American Heritage Dictionary, and number five is a very handsome man, and my wife says I’m a very handsome man, and nobody argues with my wife,” said Hart.

In 2016, Hart moved to Kentucky, where he wanted to keep the specialized plates.

However a letter from Kentucky transportation officials informed him he had been denied the specialization because the plates could be considered “vulgar or obscene.”

The ACLU and the Freedom from Religion Foundation have both joined Hart to sue Kentucky, stating the commonwealth had violated free speech.

Kentucky officials say an “IM GOD” is not in good taste and could lead to confrontations or to distracted drivers.

While Kentucky moved to have the lawsuit dismissed, a judge recently ruled the case would move forward.

Hart says the lawsuit is more than just about a specialized license plates; it’s also about guarding against the encroachment on a person’s rights.

“I think everybody should stand up for their rights,” Hart told WXIX. “If you’ve got rights, you should stand up for ’em, and if somebody’s abusing your rights, then you should stand up to that.”  

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    Kentucky Reaches Settlement in Radioactive Waste Dumping

    Image result for radioactive waste

    Kentucky officials have reached a $168,000 settlement with one of the companies accused of being involved in the dumping of radioactive waste in a landfill.

    | April 14, 2017, at 4:26 p.m.

    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky officials said Friday they reached a $168,000 settlement with one of the companies accused of being involved in dumping radioactive waste in an Appalachian landfill.

    The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services said it reached the settlement with Fairmont Brine Processing, which operates a wastewater treatment facility in West Virginia.

    Kentucky officials accused Fairmont Brine of arranging to dispose of radioactive waste in an Estill County landfill in eastern Kentucky. The company had appealed its more than $1 million civil penalty order issued by the state cabinet late last year.

    The state said Fairmont Brine contracted with a Kentucky company called Advanced TENORM Services to pick up, transport, treat and dispose of the waste. Some of it ended up in Blue Ridge Landfill in Estill County, the state said.

    Fairmont Brine denied all liability but agreed to pay the $168,000 civil penalty over a 30-month period, the state said.

    “All settlement proceeds will be directed to the Estill County Public Health Department,” cabinet Secretary Vickie Yates Brown Glisson said in a release. “The funds will be used for radiation-related public health issues in Estill County, particularly radon education and detection.”

    Fairmont Brine was one of several companies targeted with civil penalty orders related to disposal of out-of-state radioactive material in Kentucky.

    Fairmont Brine cooperated with Kentucky authorities, the cabinet said.

    The company maintained it did not intend to violate Kentucky laws. When it contracted with Advanced TENORM Services to dispose its waste, Fairmont Brine relied on the other company’s claims that the waste would be safely and legally deposited in Kentucky, the cabinet said.

    Monitoring and testing of areas at Blue Ridge Landfill have shown no evidence the disposal caused radiation or radioactive contamination above federal and state safety limits, the cabinet said.

    When the state announced the penalties in 2016, it was also seeking fines from Advanced TENORM. The company is appealing the penalty order against it, the state said.

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