Tag Archives: Texas

44 Percent of Texans Think U.S. Military Might Be Coming to Impose Martial Law

Joint Bulgarian US military training

The multistate training operation Jade Helm 15 will begin next month, and plenty of Texans still seem to think that this is all an elaborate ruse and the federal government is about to take over Texas — a state that is already part of a larger country that the federal government oversees. It wasn’t clear how many people thought that the U.S. military was building tunnels under abandoned Walmarts FEMA camps. Thanks to a new University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll, we now know that the answer is: “More than a few!”

Forty-four percent of Texas voters — including 31 percent of Democrats — think that it is very or somewhat likely that the federal government is sending troops to Texas and other states so it can impose martial law; 43 percent think it is likely that the federal government just wants to take their guns. 

Strangely enough, slightly fewer Texan voters thought that it was a good idea that Governor Greg Abbott sent the Texas State Guard to monitor the exercises, saying that it is “important that Texans know their safety, constitutional rights, private property rights, and civil liberties will not be infringed.” Thirty-nine percent of registered voters — and 85 percent of tea party Republicans — supported this move, while 32 percent had no opinion whatsoever. Although the difference between the number of people who think the government is coming to turn Texas into a socialist wasteland and those who think it is a good idea to monitor the military is within the margin of error, there’s always the possibility that a very small number of Texans think the government is coming to impose martial law and are ready to submit and declare allegiance, federalism be damned. 

If these people exist, we assume they might be friends with the people who sent aluminum-foil hat kits to Greg Abbott’s office instead of just filing a letter to complain about the Texas State Guard being deployed. 

The Texas Tribune

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Report: First U.S. Ebola patient is a foreign national

 

 

On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced that the first case of Ebola in the United States has been diagnosed, and the patient is currently being treated in an isolation unit at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. The man remains in critical condition at this time.

On September 19, the patient boarded a plane in Liberia and arrived in the U.S. the next day.

CDC Dr. Tom Frieden told reporters:

[The patient] had no symptoms when departing Liberia or entering this country. But four or five days later on the 24th of September, he began to develop symptoms. The next steps are basically threefold. First, to care for the patient … to provide the most effective care possible as safely as possible to keep to an absolute minimum the likelihood or possibility that anyone would become affected, and second, to maximize the chances that the patient might recover.

The man who was in Texas reportedly visiting relatives, actually came to the emergency room on the 26th, but was given antibiotics and released. He was admitted two days later as his condition worsened.

On Wednesday morning, Fox & Friends anchor, Peter Doocy, reported that the man is a “Liberian national.” Of course, Liberia is currently in the grips of an unprecedented Ebola outbreak, in which at least 1,830 people have died from the virus over the last few months, according to a CDC report.

While the CDC is quick to downplay the risk of a widespread Ebola outbreak on U.S. soil, it is not known how many people this patient came into contact with since landing in Dallas, and is likely impossible to discover. It also unknown at this time why the Obama administration has not banned all travel from Liberia, as well as the other countries in West Africa where Ebola is ravaging the populations.

U.S. airports currently have no system in place to screen travelers for Ebola.

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First Ebola case diagnosed in the US

Patient who recently returned from Liberia tested positive at a hospital in Dallas, Texas, health officials say.

Last updated: 01 Oct 2014 00:57

A patient being treated at a Dallas hospital has tested positive for Ebola, the first case of the disease to be diagnosed in the United States, federal health officials announced.

Officials at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said the unidentified patient is being kept in isolation and that the hospital is following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to keep doctors, staff and patients safe.

The patient is a Liberian national who was admitted on Sunday, a government official told Al Jazeera.

The hospital had announced a day earlier that the patient’s symptoms and recent travel indicated a case of Ebola, the virus that has killed more than 3,000 people across West Africa and infected a handful of Americans who have traveled to that region.

Infographic: Just how deadly is Ebola?

Thomas Frieden, director of the CDC, held a news conference at the centre’s headquarters in Atlanta late on Tuesday.

“The infected person came from Liberia on September 19 and began to develop symptoms on September 24. He first sought care on the 26th of September and on the 28th was admitted in Texas,” Frieden said.

“Blood samples tested positive for Ebola… The Ebola test is highly accurate,” Frieden said, adding: “There is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here (in the US).”

The CDC has said 12 other people in the US have been tested for Ebola since July 27. Those tests came back negative.

Under observation

Four American aid workers who have become infected while volunteering in West Africa have been treated in special isolation facilities in hospitals in Atlanta and Nebraska, and a US doctor exposed to the virus in Sierra Leone is under observation in a similar facility at the National Institutes of Health.

The US has only four such isolation units but the CDC has insisted that any hospital can safely care for someone with Ebola.

According to the CDC, Ebola symptoms can include fever, muscle pain, vomiting and bleeding, and can appear as long as 21 days after exposure to the virus.

Jason McDonald, spokesman for the CDC, said health officials use two primary guidelines when deciding whether to test a person for the virus.

“The first and foremost determinant is have they traveled to the region (of West Africa),” he said.

The second is whether there’s been proximity to family, friends or others who’ve been exposed, he said.

US health officials have been preparing since summer in case an individual traveler arrived here unknowingly infected, telling hospitals what infection-control steps to take to prevent the virus from spreading in health facilities.

People boarding planes in the outbreak zone are checked for fever, but symptoms can begin up to 21 days after exposure.

Ebola is not contagious until symptoms begin, and it takes close contact with bodily fluids to spread.

Source:  Al Jazeera and agencies